G 1 header 590px
Launching-point into the wilderness ...
G 1 Jimbour House undated-historical-image Rufus-Marcus Wikimedia-Commons THUMB

 


  

 

    

 

 

THEN

Jimbour Station came into existence in 1841 when Irishman Henry Dennis settled in the area and took up the Jimbour run on behalf of the first owner, Richard Scougall, who had come to Australia from Scotland in 1832.

He established a flock of 11,000 sheep and 700 head of mixed cattle, making it the first fully stocked station on the Darling Downs. When ownership of the holdings changed hands in 1844 (purchased by Thomas Bell), records show the station registered under the name "Gimba" or "Jimba" which was then thought to be the Aboriginal word for "good pastures".

In its early days Jimbour was one of the great properties of the Darling Downs, stretching over 300,000 acres from the Bunya Mountains to the Condamine River and from the present site of Dalby to Jandowae. Leichhardt’s relationship with Jimbour (‘Jimba’) was, like his stays at Cecil Plains, a repeated part of his tavels.

Following his initial excursions through the Darling Downs, on his way back to Sydney, Leichhardt’s first formal encounter came later in 1844 as he marshalled his party for the great push to Port Essington. At Jimbour he assembled the party, and broke in his horses and bullocks. The house in which he stayed was a primitive slab hut, which later, sadly, burnt down in 1867.

NOW

An easy drive northeast of Dalby, the small town of Jimbour is also the location of the heritage-listed Jimbour House, built in 1876. Today, visitors are welcome to tour the grounds and magnificent gardens of Jimbour House, which are open daily for a donation upon entry.

The garden entry donation includes access to the "Living History Walk" – an experience of historical plaques, sights and sounds that bring a rich and colourful heritage to life. The grounds and Chapel (circa 1868) provide a stunning setting for weddings and the venue also caters for a wide range of functions and corporate events.

A privately-owned residence today, Jimbour House has been lovingly administered under a heritage plan first developed in 2001, revised and updated regularly since. The ‘Opera at Jimbour’ event has been an annual calendar fixture since 2005. 

Today, when entering the village of Jimbour from Dalby, there is a small sign pointing towards a plaque laid in 1955 by the Royal Geographical Society commemorating Leichhardt's journey. Leichhardt is also important to the region for the “noble tree” today popularly known as the ‘Bunya Pine’ as he is believed to be the first European to have recorded both it and the Aborigines’ seasonal harvest of its falling cones.

Above: Undated 19th century view of Jimbour House. The bloke with the shovel has a very ‘Leichhardtian’ beard! 

(Rufus Marcus / Wikimedia Commons)

 

G 2 Jimbour House Garden View Rufus-Marcus Wikimedia-Commons THUMB

Above: Jimbour House and its formal garden are highlighted in this 20th century view. 

(Rufus Marcus / Wikimedia Commons)

G 3 Jimbour northeast Bunya-Mtns forest Ralph-Loesche-Shutterstock THUMB

Above: The Bunya Mountains National Park, to the northeast of Jimbour and Dalby, straddle the catchments of two river systems, and their steep slopes contain large tracts of virgin forest, unlogged and unchanged since Leichhardt’s time.

(Ralph Loesche / Shutterstock)                                                                     


OUR SPONSORS 
AND PARTNERS
LOGO GACCQ LOGO HK-BNE  LOGO BRD-CG SYD  LOGO BRD-BOT CBR www.australien.diplo.de  LOGO DFAT   LOGO MDC
   LOGO OKT-BNE 200  LOGO LGIsolde LOGO Goethe NEW 200RGB  LOGO ACfE LOGO JPC web 200RGB
          LOGO BNE-Marketing LOGO OrmeauSS 60pxH PNG-2