Woodford-unveiling MS-PW 300W thumb  

Left: Prof. Schütz and the Governor do the honours to reveal the Durundur Monument plaque.

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Woodford-unveiling RT-PW-MS 300W thumb

Left: following the unveiling, WHS President Ron Trim, Her Excellency, and Prof. Schütz pose for a formal photo.

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Durundur watercolour SLQ-4624-1v000r001 300W thumb

Left: a watercolour of Durundur Station in 1841 by one of the Archer brothers, showing the early slab huts and first clearing of the brigalow scrub. The State Library of Queensland has this work, two other paintings, and many other artefacts from Durundur in its collection.

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(SLQ-4624-1v000r001)

Our thanks to the WHS and other local reporting for the information and photos. You can also find the formal Vice-Regal report on the Government House website here and information about the WHS, including contact details, on the MBRC's website pages here and here.  You can find more photos of the monument, plaque and park on the next page of this article, thanks to John Jennings, who visited after the official opening.

Charles Archer was born in 1813 in Perth, Scotland, one of thirteen children of the timber merchant William Archer and his wife Julia, nee Walker. In 1825 the family moved to Larvik, Norway. Charles Archer and his brothers John, David, William, Archibald, Thomas and Colin successively came to Australia. Charles Archer arrived in Sydney in 1841 and worked there until 1843. By then his brothers David, Thomas and John had taken up land in the  Moreton Bay District, Durundur (or Durandur) Station near present-day Woodford. Charles joined his brothers there in 1843.

In 1845 the Archers took up runs at Woroongundi, Emu Creek and Cooyar in the Brisbane Valley. Further exploring expeditions north took Charles, William and Colin Archer as far as the Fitzroy River and the Peak Downs District. The brothers settled on the Fitzroy River in 1855 and named their property Gracemere. Present-day Rockhampton now partly occupies the original Gracemere run. Charles Archer returned to Norway in 1857 and died there in 1862 as the result of a skiing accident.

An interesting article about the fate of the Durundur estate can be found on the Queensland Historical Atlas website here.

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